Swaziland

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April 2018

Universal antiretroviral therapy (ART) for all pregnant/ breastfeeding women living with HIV, known as prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV (PMTCT) Option B+ (PMTCTB+), is being scaled up in most countries in Sub-Saharan Africa.

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April 2018

Swaziland has one of the highest adult HIV prevalence rates worldwide, 27%; with approximately 200,000 people 15 years and older living with HIV. Swaziland and many other countries in sub-Saharan Africa have adopted universal test-and-treat (UTT) policies.

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February 2018

The Violence Prevention Information System (Violence Info) is a global knowledge platform for preventing violence which collates published scientific information on the main

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January 2018

In 2016, an estimated 1.5 million females aged 15-24 years were living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection in Eastern and Southern Africa, where the prevalence of HIV infection among adolescent girls and young women (3.4%) is more than double that for males in the same age range (1.

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January 2018

Community health worker (CHW) programs are believed to be poorly coordinated, poorly integrated into national health systems, and lacking long-term support. Duplication of services, fragmentation, and resource limitations may have impeded the potential impact of CHWs for achieving HIV goals.

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December 2017

Sub-Saharan Africa bears more than two-thirds of the worldwide burden of HIV; however, data among transgender women from the region are sparse. Transgender women across the world face significant vulnerability to HIV.

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December 2017

On the sidelines of the 2017 United Nations General Assembly, U.S. Secretary of State Rex Tillerson announced the new PEPFAR Strategy for Accelerating HIV/AIDS Epidemic Control (2017-2020).

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December 2017

The AIDSFree HIV Testing Services (HTS) Guidance Database has been updated with new guidelines from many PEPFAR priority countries.

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December 2017

Rapid diagnostic testing has made HIV diagnosis and subsequent treatment more accessible. However, multiple factors, including improper implementation of testing strategies and clerical errors, have been reported to lead to HIV misdiagnosis.